Wanted: CBR-Worker. Qualifications: Not What You Would Expect

In Canada, applying for a job is a competitive and often rigorous process. In the physiotherapy world, employers typically seek the following qualifications and traits:

  • Sufficient educational background consisting of a Bachelor Degree (any field) and a Masters in Physical Therapy
  • Strong experiential background, particularly in the area of hiring interest; for example, when hiring for a position in Spinal Cord rehab, previous experience with neurological conditions is highly preferred
  • High level of ambition, drive, motivation for continual learning
  • Any extra contributions to the company; for example, intentions to spearhead new programs, volunteer with community events, etc
  • Ability to communicate and relate to colleagues, superiors, and patients and their families

Our plans for sustainability include shifting two current Samarthya staff to the Spinal Cord Rehab Center, and we’ll be sending them for more formal training with APD in Bangalore so they will be better-equipped to provide higher quality care to more clients at the center. Here was the eye-opening thought process for selection of the two rehab assistants:

  • First, the chosen staff had to be male. In rural India, traditional values are still strongly present in the culture and therefore it’s inappropriate for a woman therapist to work with male clients.
  • After ruling out women, there were five people who were candidates. We asked the two most senior staff if they were interested, and one clearly stated he did not want a lead role, and the other said that ‘he would be happy with anything’. People-pleasing and saying ‘yes’ to anything and everything is common. The other three also said they would be happy in any position.
  • A specific educational level is not required, but an ability to read, write, and learn were key. A couple staff had bachelor degrees, and therefore had experience with studying. Many of us have figured out techniques to facilitate our individual learning – from cue cards and lists to anagrams and cartoon doodles.
  • Previous experience wasn’t a factor – one staff member was trained in social sciences, one in horticulture, and one in arts. Each had some exposure to therapy work in the recent years. We would be sending the staff for training from scratch so the previous point weighed in more.
  • Next we examined each staff member’s projected commitment to Samarthya – how many years they’ve been working there and their intentions for staying around. We learned that government positions are rarely available but highly sought after. Even though the salary is lower, job stability and pension is higher. Many people would leave immediately if they were accepted into a governmental position. One of the staff has openly expressed that he’s applied to the government, so he became a less favourable choice as these positions will be a big financial investment for Samarthya, and will demand plenty of study time and effort on the staff’s part.
  • Then we had to take into account if they were married. If he was single, was his future wife ‘fixed’ (is the woman already chosen)? When was his wedding (would it be in the mdidle of training)? Which village would they live in after marriage (we need someone living locally)?
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